taekwondo preschool

taekwondo preschool

 

Taekwondo 태권도Taekwondo Preschool

Taekwondo is known for its emphasis on high kicking and fast hand techniques, which distinguishes it from other popular martial arts and combat sports such as karate. However, the World Taekwondo (WT) believes that because the leg is the longest and strongest limb a martial artist has, kicks thus have the greatest potential to execute powerful strikes without successful retaliation.
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Taekwondo 태권도 - Korean Martial Arts


Physically, taekwondo develops strength, speed, balance, flexibility, and stamina. An example of the union of mental and physical discipline is the breaking of wooden boards, bricks or tiles, which requires both physical mastery of the technique and the concentration to focus one's power.

Taekwondo is known for its emphasis on high kicking and fast hand techniques, which distinguishes it from other popular martial arts and combat sports such as karate. However, the World Taekwondo (WT) believes that because the leg is the longest and strongest limb a martial artist has, kicks thus have the greatest potential to execute powerful strikes without successful retaliation.

Taekwondo as a martial art is popular with people of both genders and of many ages. Physically, taekwondo develops strength, speed, balance, flexibility, and stamina. An example of the union of mental and physical discipline is the breaking of wooden boards, bricks or tiles, which requires both physical mastery of the technique and the concentration to focus one's power.

A taekwondo student typically wears a uniform (dobok 도복/道服), often white but sometimes black (or other colours), with a belt (ddi 띠) tied around the waist. There are at least three major styles of dobok, with the most obvious differences being in the style of jacket: (1) the cross-over front jacket that resembles traditional Asian clothing, (2) the V-neck jacket (no cross-over) typically worn by World Taekwondo (WT) practitioners, and (3) the vertical-closing front jacket (no cross-over) typically worn by ITF practitioners. The belt colour and any insignia thereon indicate the student's rank. In general, the darker the colour, the higher the rank. The school or place where instruction is given is called the dojang (도장). The grandmaster of the dojang is called a gwanjangnim (관장님); Master (senior instructor or head of dojang) is called sabeomnim (사범님); Instructor is called gyosannim (교사님); Assistant Instructor is called jogyonim (조교님).

Taekwondo is traditionally performed in bare feet, though there are specialist training shoes that can sometimes be worn.

Although each taekwondo club or school will be different, a student typically takes part in most or all of the following:

iBook Taekwondo Preschool
  • Learning the techniques and curriculum of taekwondo
  • Both anaerobic and aerobic workout, including stretching
  • Self-defense techniques (hosinsool 호신술)
  • Patterns (also called forms, poomse 품새/品勢, tul 틀, hyeong 형/型)
  • Sparring (called gyeorugi 겨루기 in World Taekwondo (WT), or matseogi 맞서기 in the International Taekwondo Federation (ITF)), which may include 7-, 3-, 2- and 1-step sparring, free-style sparring, arranged sparring, point sparring, and other types
  • Relaxation and meditation exercises; breathing control
  • Throwing and/or falling techniques (deonjigi 던지기 and ddeoreojigi 떨어지기)
  • A focus on mental and ethical discipline, etiquette, justice, respect, and self-confidence
  • Breaking (gyeokpa 격파 or weerok), using techniques to break boards for testing, training and martial arts demonstrations. Demonstrations often also incorporate bricks, tiles, and blocks of ice or other materials. Can be separated into three types:
    • Power breaking – using straightforward techniques to break as many boards as possible
    • Speed breaking – boards are held loosely by one edge, putting special focus on the speed required to perform the break
    • Special techniques – breaking fewer boards but using jumping or flying techniques to attain greater heights, distances, or to clear obstacles
  • Exams to progress to the next rank

 

  Some schools teach the "sine wave" technique when performing patterns. This involves raising one's center of gravity between techniques, then lowering it as the technique is performed, producing the up-and-down movement from which the term "sine wave" is derived. Other schools teach that one's center of gravity should remain generally constant throughout the performance of a pattern except where the pattern's description states otherwise.

 

Question. What is the korean terminology for Back Stance?

This stance is specifically focused on shifting weight to the back leg, as it offers much more control, and makes it easier to kick off the front leg. To perform this stance, the body faces to the side, with the front foot facing forward and the front leg bent. The back leg is bent slightly and the foot is turned outwards perpendicular to the front foot making the letter "L" for this stance.

 

Question. What is the name of Taegeuk #2 in Korean?

Taegeuk 태극 (in World Taekwondo (WT)) refers to a set of poomse 품새 used to create a foundation for the teaching of taekwondo. A poomse or form is a detailed pattern of defense-and-attack motions and techniques used in traditional martial arts. Each taegeuk form symbolizes a specific state thought to be indicative of the belt the student currently holds, and is represented in World Taekwondo (WT) by trigrams similar to those found in the four corners of the South Korean flag.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Stances ( 서기 sogi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

Stances ( 서기 sogi )

The Korean martial arts has several stances ( 서기 sogi ) used for different activities. Although there are strong similarities in stances throughout taekwondo schools, individual instructors often have their own preferred style. These stances are most commonly seen in taekwondo forms, and are critical for balance, precision, and good technique in the martial art. View on Apple iTunes »

Blocking ( 막기 makgi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

Blocking ( 막기 makgi )

In martial arts, blocking ( 막기 makgi ) is the act of stopping or deflecting an opponent's attack for the purpose of preventing injurious contact with the body. A block usually consists of placing a limb across the line of the attack. Blocks are considered by some to be the most direct and least subtle of defensive techniques. View on Apple iTunes »

Kicking ( 차기 chagi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

Kicking ( 차기 chagi )

A kick (차기 chagi) is a physical strike using the foot, leg, or knee. As the human leg is longer and stronger than the arm, kicks are generally used to keep an opponent at a distance, surprise him or her with their range, and inflict substantial damage. On the other hand, stance is very important in any combat system, and any attempt to deliver a kick will necessarily compromise one's stability of stance. View on Apple iTunes »

Fist Strikes ( 지르기 jireugi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

Fist Strikes ( 지르기 jireugi )

Taekwondo hand strikes are performed as a close distance alternative to kicks. They are executed in a number of ways - from standing, jumping, spinning and rushing forwards. Hand strikes make up fast combinations of strikes which can leave an opponent stunned and unable to defend himself. View on Apple iTunes »

Strikes ( 치기 chigi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

Strikes ( 치기 chigi )

Various surfaces of the hand may be engaged as the striking surface depending on which area of the opponents body which is being targeted. Striking ( 치기 chigi ) are techniques striking with twisting force of body excluding techniques using fist or fingertips. Thrusting ( 찌르기 Jjireugi ) are techniques striking with finger tips. Chopping ( 찍기 Jjikgi ) are techniques striking with curled fingers. This leads to a large array of hand positions. View on Apple iTunes »

History of Taekwondo

History of Taekwondo

The oldest Korean martial art was an amalgamation of unarmed combat styles developed by the three rival Korean Kingdoms of Goguryeo, Silla, and Baekje, where young men were trained in unarmed combat techniques to develop strength, speed, and survival skills. The most popular of these techniques was ssireum and subak with taekkyeon being the most popular of the segments of subak. View on Apple iTunes »

 

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RESOURCES
This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "Taekwondo", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

 

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taekwondo preschool

VISIT OTHER TAEKWONDO AND KOREAN CULTURE WEBSITES

 

Kukkiwon - Official Taekwondo Headquarters  Official World Taekwondo (WT)  Dartfish TKD TV  Taekwondo Wikia Homepage  ITF Korea Headquarters  Arirang TV