Taekwondo 태권도Taekwondo Preschool

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Taekwondo Organizations

Two of the most popular systems of taekwondo are named solely after their respective organizations: the World Taekwondo (WT) and the International Taekwondo Federation (ITF). For more information View Taekwondo Organizations »

Taekwondo Kwans ( 관 )

The original Taekwondo Kwans. In Korean literally means building or hall, but when used in martial arts it can also refer to a school or clan of martial artists who follow the same style and/or leader.. For more information View Taekwondo Kwans ( 관 ) »

Taekwondo Blocks ( 막기 makgi )

In martial arts, blocking is the act of stopping or deflecting an opponent's attack for the purpose of preventing injurious contact with the body. A block usually consists of placing a limb across the line of the attack. Blocks are considered by some to be the most direct and least subtle of defensive techniques. Other ways of avoiding attack include evasion, trapping, slipping and deflection of the oncoming attack; this approach is often referred to as the application of 'soft' techniques.

View all taekwondo blocks on the Blocks ( 막기 makgi ) Main Section »

Taekwondo Kicks (차기 chagi)

kick (차기 chagi) is a physical strike using the foot, leg, or knee. As the human leg is longer and stronger than the arm, kicks are generally used to keep an opponent at a distance, surprise him or her with their range, and inflict substantial damage. On the other hand, stance is very important in any combat system, and any attempt to deliver a kick will necessarily compromise one's stability of stance. For more information View Taekwondo Kicks (차기 chagi) »

 

Taekwondo Poomse 품새

A poomse is a systematic, prearranged sequence of techniques that is performed either with or without the use of a weapon. In traditional dojangs (training halls), poomse are used primarily as a form of interval training that is useful in developing mushin, proper kinetics and mental and physical fortitude. Poomse may resemble combat, but are artistically non-combative and woven together so as to be an effective conditioning tool. View more information about Poomse 품새 ».

 

World Taekwondo (WT) Taegeuk 태극 Poomse

Taegeuk 태극 (in World Taekwondo (WT)) refers to a set of poomse 품새 used to create a foundation for the teaching of Taekwondo. A poomse, or form, is represented by 形 or 型 and is a detailed pattern of defense-and-attack motions and techniques used in traditional martial arts. The word Taeguek (the Korean pronunciation of Taiji/T'ai Chi) refers to the important principle in east Asian Taoist thought of the union of yin and yang. Each Taegeuk form symbolizes a specific state thought to be indicative of the belt the student currently holds, and is represented in World Taekwondo (WT) by trigrams similar to those found in the four corners of the South Korean flag. View more information about Taegeuk 태극 Poomse ».

 

World Taekwondo (WT) Palgwe Forms

The Palgwe forms are a slightly older, somewhat similar supplemental group of World Taekwondo (WT) poomse. There are eight Palgwe forms that also represent eight trigrams from I-Ching. Palgwe poomse were used from 1967 to 1971. Taegeuk poomse have been in use from 1971 to the present time. Kukkiwon states that Palgwe poomse have been eliminated though some schools still teach them. View more information about Palgwe Forms ».

 

World Taekwondo (WT) Black Belt Forms

Each Dan (degree of black belt) also has its own associated form/pattern that is required for black belt testing. The forms have a higher degree of difficulty in Taekwondo techniques. View more information about Black Belt section ».

 

International Taekwondo Federation (ITF) Tul Forms

The International Taekwon-Do Federation (ITF) has its own sequence of poomse. They are named after figures from Korean history. The first nine, which are required for 1st degree black belt, are named after significant Korean historical figures or concepts: cheongji, dangun, dosan, wonhyo, yulgok, joonggun, toegye, hwarang, and chung mu. View more information about ITF Tuls ».

 

International Taekwondo Federation (ITF) Black Belt Tul Forms

  • Kwang Gae (39 Movements) 1st dan
  • Po-Eun (36 Movements) 1st dan
  • Ge-Baek (44 Movements) 1st dan
  • Eui-Am (45 Movements) 2nd dan
  • Choong-Jang (52 Movements) 2nd dan
  • Juche (45 Movements)/Ko-Dang (39 Movements) 2nd dan
  • Sam-Il (33 Movements) 3rd dan
  • Yoo-Sin (68 Movements) 3rd dan
  • Choi-Yong (46 Movements) 3rd dan
  • Yon-Gae (49 Movements) 4th dan
  • Ul-Ji (42 Movements) 4th dan
  • Moon-Moo (61 Movements) 4th dan
  • So-San (72 Movements) 5th dan
  • Se-Jong (24 Movements) 5th dan
  • Tong-Il (56 Movements) 6th dan

 

Warming Up

A warm-up generally consists of a gradual increase in intensity in physical activity (a "pulse raiser"), joint mobility exercise, and stretching, followed by the activity. Warming up brings the body to a condition at which it safely responds to nerve signals for quick and efficient action.

 

 

 

 

 

 

iBooks on your Mac or iOS device

Take the training on the go as a method of personal growth or recreation.

These books are available for download with iBooks on your Mac or iOS device, and with iTunes on your computer. Books can be read with iBooks on your Mac or iOS device. View on Apple iTunes! Available Now!

 

Stances ( 서기 sogi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Stances ( 서기 sogi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Stances ( 서기 sogi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

Stances ( 서기 sogi )

The Korean martial arts has several stances ( 서기 sogi ) used for different activities. Although there are strong similarities in stances throughout taekwondo schools, individual instructors often have their own preferred style. These stances are most commonly seen in taekwondo forms, and are critical for balance, precision, and good technique in the martial art.
View on Apple iTunes »

Blocking ( 막기 makgi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Blocking ( 막기 makgi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Blocking ( 막기 makgi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

Blocking ( 막기 makgi )

In martial arts, blocking ( 막기 makgi ) is the act of stopping or deflecting an opponent's attack for the purpose of preventing injurious contact with the body. A block usually consists of placing a limb across the line of the attack. Blocks are considered by some to be the most direct and least subtle of defensive techniques.
View on Apple iTunes »

 

Kicking ( 차기 chagi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Kicking ( 차기 chagi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Kicking ( 차기 chagi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

Kicking ( 차기 chagi )

A kick (차기 chagi) is a physical strike using the foot, leg, or knee. As the human leg is longer and stronger than the arm, kicks are generally used to keep an opponent at a distance, surprise him or her with their range, and inflict substantial damage. On the other hand, stance is very important in any combat system, and any attempt to deliver a kick will necessarily compromise one's stability of stance.
View on Apple iTunes »

Fist Strikes ( 지르기 jireugi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Fist Strikes ( 지르기 jireugi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Fist Strikes ( 지르기 jireugi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

Fist Strikes ( 지르기 jireugi )

Taekwondo hand strikes are performed as a close distance alternative to kicks. They are executed in a number of ways - from standing, jumping, spinning and rushing forwards. Hand strikes make up fast combinations of strikes which can leave an opponent stunned and unable to defend himself.
View on Apple iTunes »

 

Strikes ( 치기 chigi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Strikes ( 치기 chigi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Strikes ( 치기 chigi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

Strikes ( 치기 chigi )

Various surfaces of the hand may be engaged as the striking surface depending on which area of the opponents body which is being targeted. Striking ( 치기 chigi ) are techniques striking with twisting force of body excluding techniques using fist or fingertips. Thrusting ( 찌르기 Jjireugi ) are techniques striking with finger tips. Chopping ( 찍기 Jjikgi ) are techniques striking with curled fingers. This leads to a large array of hand positions.
View on Apple iTunes »

History of Taekwondo - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version History of Taekwondo - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version History of Taekwondo - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

History of Taekwondo

The oldest Korean martial art was an amalgamation of unarmed combat styles developed by the three rival Korean Kingdoms of Goguryeo, Silla, and Baekje, where young men were trained in unarmed combat techniques to develop strength, speed, and survival skills. The most popular of these techniques was ssireum and subak with taekkyeon being the most popular of the segments of subak.
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VISIT OTHER TAEKWONDO AND KOREAN CULTURE WEBSITES

 

Kukkiwon - Official Taekwondo Headquarters  Official World Taekwondo (WT)  Dartfish TKD TV  Taekwondo Wikia Homepage  ITF Korea Headquarters  Arirang TV