taekwondo preschool

 

Taekwondo 태권도Taekwondo Preschool

Promotion from one geup to the next can proceed rapidly in some schools, since schools often allow geup promotions every two, three, or four months. Students of geup rank learn the most basic techniques first, and then move on to more advanced techniques as they approach first dan. Many of the older and more traditional schools often take longer to allow students to test for higher ranks than newer, more contemporary schools, as they may not have the required testing intervals. View Taekwondo belt levels »

Taekwondo Preschool

About Palgwe Forms


Poomse is the foundation for the teaching of Taekwondo. A poomse, or form, is a detailed pattern of defense-and-attack motions and techniques used in traditional martial arts. Poomse is useful in developing proper kinetics, mental and physical fortitude.

The palgwe forms are a slightly older, somewhat similar supplemental group of World Taekwondo (WT) poomse. There are eight palgwe forms that also represent eight trigrams from I-Ching. Palgwe poomse were used from 1967 to 1971. Taegeuk poomse have been in use from 1971 to the present time. Kukkiwon states that palgwe poomse have been eliminated though some schools still teach them.

 


 

Yellow Strip Belt

Palgwe #1 Il Jang

The general meaning of this form and associated trigram is Yang, which represents Heaven and Light. Also, this trigram has a relationship to South and Father. The first palgwe form is the beginning of all poomses, the "birth" of the martial artist into Taekwondo. This poomse should be performed with the greatness of Heaven.


Yellow Belt

Palgwe #2 Yi Jang

The associated trigram of this poomse represents the Lake (joy, a calm sturdy spirit:). Also, related to the symbol is South East and the relationship of the youngest daughter. The movements of this palgwe are aimed to be performed believing that man has limitations, but that we can overcome these limitations. The Lake and its water symbolize the flowing and calm nature of the martial artist. This form is to reflect those attributes.


Green Strip Belt

Palgwe #3 Sam Jang

This trigram represents Fire. Related to this symbol is also East and the relationship of the Second Daughter. Fire contains a lot of energy. The symbol behind the fire is similar to the symbolism of the water in that both can aid and both can destroy. This form is intended to be performed rhythmically, with some outbursts of energy to reflect fire's rhythmic and energetic dualism.


Green Belt

Palgwe #4 Sa Jang

This trigram represents Thunder. Also, the trigram is strongly connected to northeast and the relationship of the Eldest son. Thunder comes from the sky and is absorbed by the earth, thus, according to the beliefs of the I Ching, thunder is one of the most powerful natural forces. This poomse is associated with power and the connection between the heavens and earth. This poomse is intended to be performed with power resembling the Thunder for which it is named.


Blue Strip Belt

Palgwe #5 O Jang

The trigram associated with this poomse represents Wind. The trigram is also related to southwest and the relationship with an eldest daughter. The I Ching promotes that wind is a gentle force, but can sometimes be furious, destroying everything in its path. As such, it is intended that this poomse is performed like the wind: gently, but knowing the ability of mass destruction with a single movement. The performer and audience should be aware of the duality of the form.


Blue Belt

Palgwe #6 Yuk Jang

The trigram associated with this poomse represents Water. Also, there is a relation to West and the relationship with a Second son. The movements of this poomse are intended to be performed like water; flowing, powerful and cleansing. Sometimes standing still like water in a lake, sometimes thriving as a river, sometimes powerful like a waterfall. The water is to symbolize calm and cleansing, while also possessing the attribute of being violent and destructive.


Red Strip Belt

Palgwe #7 Chil Jang

The trigram associated with this poomse represents a Mountain. Also, it represents the northwest and youngest son. The symbolism behind the mountain is the indomitable and majestic nature that all mountains possess. This poomse is intended to be performed with the feeling that all movements are this majestic due to their unconquerable nature.


Red Belt

Palgwe #8 Pal Jang

The trigram associated with this poomse represents the Earth. Also, there is a representation of North and Mother. The associated trigram of this poomse is Yin. Yin, here, represents the end of the beginning, the evil part of all that is good. This being the last of the poomse palgwe, it represents the end of the circle and the cyclic nature of the Earth.

 

Question. What is the korean terminology for Back Stance?

This stance is specifically focused on shifting weight to the back leg, as it offers much more control, and makes it easier to kick off the front leg. To perform this stance, the body faces to the side, with the front foot facing forward and the front leg bent. The back leg is bent slightly and the foot is turned outwards perpendicular to the front foot making the letter "L" for this stance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Stances ( 서기 sogi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Stances ( 서기 sogi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Stances ( 서기 sogi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

Stances ( 서기 sogi )

The Korean martial arts has several stances ( 서기 sogi ) used for different activities. Although there are strong similarities in stances throughout taekwondo schools, individual instructors often have their own preferred style. These stances are most commonly seen in taekwondo forms, and are critical for balance, precision, and good technique in the martial art.
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Blocking ( 막기 makgi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Blocking ( 막기 makgi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Blocking ( 막기 makgi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

Blocking ( 막기 makgi )

In martial arts, blocking ( 막기 makgi ) is the act of stopping or deflecting an opponent's attack for the purpose of preventing injurious contact with the body. A block usually consists of placing a limb across the line of the attack. Blocks are considered by some to be the most direct and least subtle of defensive techniques.
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Kicking ( 차기 chagi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Kicking ( 차기 chagi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Kicking ( 차기 chagi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

Kicking ( 차기 chagi )

A kick (차기 chagi) is a physical strike using the foot, leg, or knee. As the human leg is longer and stronger than the arm, kicks are generally used to keep an opponent at a distance, surprise him or her with their range, and inflict substantial damage. On the other hand, stance is very important in any combat system, and any attempt to deliver a kick will necessarily compromise one's stability of stance.
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Fist Strikes ( 지르기 jireugi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Fist Strikes ( 지르기 jireugi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Fist Strikes ( 지르기 jireugi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

Fist Strikes ( 지르기 jireugi )

Taekwondo hand strikes are performed as a close distance alternative to kicks. They are executed in a number of ways - from standing, jumping, spinning and rushing forwards. Hand strikes make up fast combinations of strikes which can leave an opponent stunned and unable to defend himself.
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Strikes ( 치기 chigi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Strikes ( 치기 chigi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Strikes ( 치기 chigi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

Strikes ( 치기 chigi )

Various surfaces of the hand may be engaged as the striking surface depending on which area of the opponents body which is being targeted. Striking ( 치기 chigi ) are techniques striking with twisting force of body excluding techniques using fist or fingertips. Thrusting ( 찌르기 Jjireugi ) are techniques striking with finger tips. Chopping ( 찍기 Jjikgi ) are techniques striking with curled fingers. This leads to a large array of hand positions.
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History of Taekwondo - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version History of Taekwondo - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version History of Taekwondo - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

History of Taekwondo

The oldest Korean martial art was an amalgamation of unarmed combat styles developed by the three rival Korean Kingdoms of Goguryeo, Silla, and Baekje, where young men were trained in unarmed combat techniques to develop strength, speed, and survival skills. The most popular of these techniques was ssireum and subak with taekkyeon being the most popular of the segments of subak.
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Palgwe Forms

The Palgwe forms are a slightly older, somewhat similar supplemental group of World Taekwondo (WT) poomse. There are eight Palgwe forms that also represent eight trigrams from I-Ching. Palgwe poomse were used from 1967 to 1971. Taegeuk poomse have been in use from 1971 to the present time. Kukkiwon states that Palgwe poomse have been eliminated though some schools still teach them. View more information about Palgwe Forms »

palgwe 1 palgwe 2 palgwe 3 palgwe 4 palgwe 5 palgwe 6 palgwe 7 palgwe 8

 

General qualities that judges look for in any taekwondo practitioner include proper breathing technique and body control. The diaphragm must be engaged in deep breathing, shallow breathing concentrated in the upper abdomen results in raised shoulders and stressed muscles. The muscles of the body should be lightly relaxed in order to perform the pattern with fluidity, speed and grace. Muscles should only be tensed at the moment of imaginary impact in order to commute maximum power to any individual taekwondo technique. For more information View Key Points »

RESOURCES
This article uses material from the Wikipedia articles "Taegeuk" and "Hyeong", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

 

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