taekwondo preschool

taekwondo preschool

 

Taekwondo 태권도Taekwondo Preschool

Promotion from one geup to the next can proceed rapidly in some schools, since schools often allow geup promotions every two, three, or four months. Students of geup rank learn the most basic techniques first, and then move on to more advanced techniques as they approach first dan. Many of the older and more traditional schools often take longer to allow students to test for higher ranks than newer, more contemporary schools, as they may not have the required testing intervals. View Taekwondo belt levels »

Taekwondo Preschool

Dhee 띠 (Taekwondo Belts)


Around the dobok a dhee 띠  or ti is worn. The colour of the belt denotes the rank or grade of the wearer. Coloured belts are for geup-holders, while black belts are usually worn by dan-holders. The order of belt colours may differ from school to school. Most commonly the first belt is a white belt. Other colours are typically yellow, green, blue, red, and then black. Some schools use other colours, such as brown in place of red.

Taekwondo ranks are typically separated into "junior" and "senior," or "student" and "instructor," sections. The junior section typically consists of ten ranks indicated by the Korean word geup (also Romanized as gup or kup). The junior ranks are usually identified by belts of various colors, depending on the school, so these ranks are sometimes called "color belts". Geup rank may be indicated by stripes on belts rather than by colored belts. Students begin at tenth geup (often indicated by a white belt) and advance toward first geup (often indicated by a red belt with a black stripe).

iBook Taekwondo Preschool

The senior section is typically made up of nine ranks. These ranks are called dan, also referred to as "black belts" or "degrees" (as in "third dan" or "third-degree black belt"). Black belts begin at first degree and advance to second, third, and so on. The degree is often indicated on the belt itself with stripes, Roman numerals, or other methods; but sometimes black belts are plain and unadorned regardless of rank.

To advance from one rank to the next, students typically complete promotion tests in which they demonstrate their proficiency in the various aspects of the art before a panel of judges or their teacher. Promotion tests vary from school to school, but may include such elements as the execution of patterns ( Poomse 품새 ), which combine various techniques in specific sequences; the breaking of boards to demonstrate the ability to use techniques with both power and control; sparring and self-defense to demonstrate the practical application and control of techniques; physical fitness usually with pushups; and answering questions on terminology, concepts and history to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the art. For higher dan tests, students are sometimes required to take a written test or submit a research paper in addition to taking the practical test.

Promotion from one geup to the next can proceed rapidly in some schools, since schools often allow geup promotions every two, three, or four months. Students of geup rank learn the most basic techniques first, and then move on to more advanced techniques as they approach first dan. Many of the older and more traditional schools often take longer to allow students to test for higher ranks than newer, more contemporary schools, as they may not have the required testing intervals.

In contrast, promotion from one dan to the next can take years. The general rule is that a black belt may advance from one rank to the next only after the number of years equivalent to the current rank. For example, a newly promoted third-degree black belt may not be allowed to advance to fourth-degree until three years have passed. Some organizations also have age requirements related to dan promotions, and may grant younger students poom 품 (junior black belt) ranks rather than dan ranks until they reach a certain age.

Black belt ranks may have titles associated with them, such as "master" and "instructor" but taekwondo organizations vary widely in rules and standards when it comes to ranks and titles. What holds true in one organization may not hold true in another, as is the case in many martial art systems. For example, achieving first dan ranking with three years' training might be typical in one organization, but fast in another organization, and likewise for other ranks. Similarly, the title for a given dan rank in one organization might not be the same as the title for that dan rank in another organization.

 

 

 

 

Belt

Grade Level

Meaning

Poomse

White Belt 10th Geup White - Signifies innocence, as that of the beginning student who has no previous knowledge of Taekwondo Kibon Basic #1
Yellow Strip 9th Geup White with yellow tag Taegeuk #1
Yellow Belt 8th Geup Yellow - Signifies the earth from which a plant sprouts and takes root as the foundation of Taekwon-Do is being laid. Taegeuk #2
Green Strip 7th Geup Yellow with green tag Taegeuk #3
Green Belt 6th Geup Green - Signifies the plant's growth as Taekwon-Do skills begin to develop. Taegeuk #4
Blue Strip 5th Geup Green with blue tag Taegeuk #5
Blue Belt 4th Geup Blue - Signifies the Heaven towards which the plant matures into a towering tree as training in Taekwon-Do progresses. Taegeuk #6
Red Strip 3rd Geup Blue with red tag Taegeuk #7
Red Belt 2nd Geup Red - Signifies Danger, cautioning the student to exercise control and warning the opponent to stay away. Taegeuk #8
Black Strip 1st Geup Red with black tag Koryo
1st Dan Black Belt 1st Dan Black - Opposite of white, therefore signifying maturity and proficiency in Taekwon-Do; also indicates the wearer's imperviousness to darkness and fear. Koryo
2nd Dan Black Belt 2nd Dan Assistant Instructor (must remain at this rank at least 2 years) Keumgang
3rd Dan Black Belt 3rd Dan Assistant Instructor (must remain at this rank at least 3 years) Taebaek
4th Dan Black Belt 4th Dan International Instructor (must remain at this rank at least 4 years). At this point, a person may become a "Sabumnim" Pyongwon
5th Dan Black Belt 5th Dan Instructor (must remain at this rank at least 5 years) Sipjin
6th Dan Black Belt 6th Dan Instructor (must remain at this rank at least 6 years) Jitae

 

Question. What is the name of Taegeuk #2 in Korean?

Taegeuk 태극 (in World Taekwondo (WT)) refers to a set of poomse 품새 used to create a foundation for the teaching of taekwondo. A poomse or form is a detailed pattern of defense-and-attack motions and techniques used in traditional martial arts. Each taegeuk form symbolizes a specific state thought to be indicative of the belt the student currently holds, and is represented in World Taekwondo (WT) by trigrams similar to those found in the four corners of the South Korean flag.

 

 

 

There are five tenets defined in the International Taekwondo Federation (ITF) and several more in World Taekwondo (WT).

Integrity ( Yeom Chi / 염치 ): "Although it may be similar, this form of integrity takes on a more wider role then defined in the common dictionary. In taekwondo, integrity means not only to determine what is right or wrong but also having the conscience to feel guilt if one has done wrong and to have the integrity stand up for what is right." View Taekwondo Tenets »

RESOURCES
This article uses material from the Wikipedia articles "Taekwondo" and "International Taekwondo Federation Ranks", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

 

SiteLock

 

 

 

Taekwondo Preschool Apple iBook version

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taekwondo Preschool Apple iBook version

 

 

taekwondo preschool

VISIT OTHER TAEKWONDO AND KOREAN CULTURE WEBSITES

 

Kukkiwon - Official Taekwondo Headquarters  Official World Taekwondo (WT)  Dartfish TKD TV  Taekwondo Wikia Homepage  ITF Korea Headquarters  Arirang TV