Taekwondo 태권도Taekwondo Preschool

When you reach senior belt you are expected to guide the junior belts when they are beginning Taekwondo such as showing by example. To advance from one rank to the next, students typically complete promotion tests in which they demonstrate their proficiency in the various aspects of the art before a panel of judges or their teacher. View Taekwondo belt levels »

Taekwondo Preschool

About Techniques


Physically, taekwondo develops strength, speed, balance, flexibility, and stamina. An example of the union of mental and physical discipline is the breaking of wooden boards, bricks or tiles, which requires both physical mastery of the technique and the concentration to focus one's power.

Taekwondo is characterized by its emphasis on head-height kicks, jumping and spinning kicks, and fast kicking techniques which distinguishes it from other popular martial arts and combat sports such as karate. However, the World Taekwondo (WT) believes that because the leg is the longest and strongest limb a martial artist has, kicks thus have the greatest potential to execute powerful strikes without successful retaliation. In fact, World Taekwondo (WT) sparring competitions award additional points for strikes that incorporate jumping and spinning kicks. To facilitate fast, turning kicks, taekwondo generally adopts stances that are narrower and hence less-stable that the broader, wide stances used by martial arts such as karate. The tradeoff of decreased stability is believed to be worth the commensurate increase in agility.

Taekwondo as a martial art is popular with people of both genders and of many ages. Physically, taekwondo develops strength, speed, balance, flexibility, and stamina. An example of the union of mental and physical discipline is the breaking of wooden boards, bricks or tiles, which requires both physical mastery of the technique and the concentration to focus one's power.

 

A kick is a physical strike using the foot, leg, or knee In martial arts, blocking is the act of stopping or deflecting an opponent's attack for the purpose of preventing injurious contact with the body The Korean martial arts has several stances used for different activities Taekwondo hand strikes are performed as a close distance alternative to kicks Jireugi - Punches/Closed Hand Strikes Open Hand Strikes Area of Impact Breaking, the discipline of destroying inanimate materials such as wooden boards, bats, ice or bricks is a feature common to several Asian martial arts Sparring is a form of training common to many combat sports. Although the precise form varies, it is essentially relatively 'free-form' fighting, with enough rules, customs, or agreements to make injuries unlikely World Taekwondo Federation Sparring ITF sparring Tournament Weight Categories Tournament Referee Tournament Point System Taekwondo self-defense is known as hosinsul and it forms one of the four main principles of the art Pressure Point Footwork involves keeping balance, closing or furthering the distance, controlling spatial positioning, and/or creating additional momentum for strikes One Step Sparring Taekwondo Drills Countering Techniques Striking Strategies Taekwondo Striking Principals Kids Taekwondo Block Kids Taekwondo Stance

 

Theory of Power ( International Taekwondo Federation (ITF) )

This emphasis on speed and agility is a defining characteristic of taekwondo and has its origins in analyses undertaken by Choi Hong Hi. The results of that analysis are known by ITF practitioners as Choi's Theory of Power. Choi's Theory of Power is based on biomechanics and Newtonian physics. For example, Choi observed that the power of a strike increases quadratically with the speed of the strike, but increases only linearly with the mass of the striking object. In other words, speed is more important than size in terms of generating power. This principle was incorporated into the early design of taekwondo and is still used.

International Taekwondo Federation

Choi also advocated a relax and strike principle for taekwondo; in other words, between blocks, kicks, and strikes the practitioner should relax the body, then tense the muscles only while performing the technique. It is believed that this too increases the power of the technique, by conserving the body's energy. He expanded on this principle with his advocacy of the "sine wave" technique. This involves raising one's center of gravity between techniques, then lowering it as the technique is performed, producing the up-and-down movement from which the term "sine wave" is derived. The "sine wave" is generally practiced, however, only in some schools that follow ITF-style taekwondo. Kukkiwon-style taekwondo, for example, does not employ the "sine wave" and instead advocates a more uniform height during movements.

The components of the Theory of Power include:

  • Reaction Force - the principle that as the striking limb is brought forward, other parts of the body should be brought backward in order to provide more power to the striking limb. As an example, if the right leg is brought forward in a roundhouse kick, the right arm is brought backward to provide the reaction force.
  • Concentration - the principle of bringing as many muscles as possible to bear on a strike, concentrating the area of impact into as small an area as possible
  • Equilibrium - as previously mentioned, the relatively narrow stances of taekwondo require increased emphasis on maintaining a correct center-of-balance throughout a technique
  • Breath Control - the idea that during a strike one should exhale, with the exhalation concluding at the moment of impact
  • Mass - the principle of bringing as much of the body to bear on a strike as possible; again using the roundhouse kick as an example, the idea would be to rotate the hip as well as the leg during the kick in order to take advantage of the hip's additional mass in terms of providing power to the kick
  • Speed - as previously mentioned however, speed is considered the most important component of developing power in taekwondo.

 

Question. What is the name of Taegeuk #2 in Korean?

Taegeuk 태극 (in World Taekwondo (WT)) refers to a set of poomse 품새 used to create a foundation for the teaching of taekwondo. A poomse or form is a detailed pattern of defense-and-attack motions and techniques used in traditional martial arts. Each taegeuk form symbolizes a specific state thought to be indicative of the belt the student currently holds, and is represented in World Taekwondo (WT) by trigrams similar to those found in the four corners of the South Korean flag.

 

 

 

 

 

 

iBooks on your Mac or iOS device

Take the training on the go as a method of personal growth or recreation.

These books are available for download with iBooks on your Mac or iOS device, and with iTunes on your computer. Books can be read with iBooks on your Mac or iOS device. View on Apple iTunes! Available Now!

 

Stances ( 서기 sogi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Stances ( 서기 sogi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Stances ( 서기 sogi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

Stances ( 서기 sogi )

The Korean martial arts has several stances ( 서기 sogi ) used for different activities. Although there are strong similarities in stances throughout taekwondo schools, individual instructors often have their own preferred style. These stances are most commonly seen in taekwondo forms, and are critical for balance, precision, and good technique in the martial art.
View on Apple iTunes »

Blocking ( 막기 makgi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Blocking ( 막기 makgi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Blocking ( 막기 makgi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

Blocking ( 막기 makgi )

In martial arts, blocking ( 막기 makgi ) is the act of stopping or deflecting an opponent's attack for the purpose of preventing injurious contact with the body. A block usually consists of placing a limb across the line of the attack. Blocks are considered by some to be the most direct and least subtle of defensive techniques.
View on Apple iTunes »

 

Kicking ( 차기 chagi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Kicking ( 차기 chagi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Kicking ( 차기 chagi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

Kicking ( 차기 chagi )

A kick (차기 chagi) is a physical strike using the foot, leg, or knee. As the human leg is longer and stronger than the arm, kicks are generally used to keep an opponent at a distance, surprise him or her with their range, and inflict substantial damage. On the other hand, stance is very important in any combat system, and any attempt to deliver a kick will necessarily compromise one's stability of stance.
View on Apple iTunes »

Fist Strikes ( 지르기 jireugi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Fist Strikes ( 지르기 jireugi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Fist Strikes ( 지르기 jireugi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

Fist Strikes ( 지르기 jireugi )

Taekwondo hand strikes are performed as a close distance alternative to kicks. They are executed in a number of ways - from standing, jumping, spinning and rushing forwards. Hand strikes make up fast combinations of strikes which can leave an opponent stunned and unable to defend himself.
View on Apple iTunes »

 

Strikes ( 치기 chigi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Strikes ( 치기 chigi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version Strikes ( 치기 chigi ) - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

Strikes ( 치기 chigi )

Various surfaces of the hand may be engaged as the striking surface depending on which area of the opponents body which is being targeted. Striking ( 치기 chigi ) are techniques striking with twisting force of body excluding techniques using fist or fingertips. Thrusting ( 찌르기 Jjireugi ) are techniques striking with finger tips. Chopping ( 찍기 Jjikgi ) are techniques striking with curled fingers. This leads to a large array of hand positions.
View on Apple iTunes »

History of Taekwondo - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version History of Taekwondo - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version History of Taekwondo - Taekwondo Preschool iBook version

History of Taekwondo

The oldest Korean martial art was an amalgamation of unarmed combat styles developed by the three rival Korean Kingdoms of Goguryeo, Silla, and Baekje, where young men were trained in unarmed combat techniques to develop strength, speed, and survival skills. The most popular of these techniques was ssireum and subak with taekkyeon being the most popular of the segments of subak.
View on Apple iTunes »

 

Risk of injury can be reduced by completing an effective warm up consisting of a heart raiser to get your pulse up, followed by sport specific dynamic stretches (stretches whilst moving). Please follow the guidance of a certified Master Instructor or trainer when doing sports related activities. Depending on the intensity of the exercise, cooling down can involve a slow jog or walk, or with lower intensities, stretching can be used. Cooling down allows the heart rate to return to its resting rate. View more information on Warming Up and Cooling Down ».

This article uses material from the Wikipedia articles "Warming Up" and "Cooling Down", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

RESOURCES
This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "Taekwondo", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

 

SiteLock

 

 

 

Taekwondo Preschool Apple iBook version

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taekwondo Preschool Apple iBook version

 

 

taekwondo preschool

VISIT OTHER TAEKWONDO AND KOREAN CULTURE WEBSITES

 

Kukkiwon - Official Taekwondo Headquarters  Official World Taekwondo (WT)  Dartfish TKD TV  Taekwondo Wikia Homepage  ITF Korea Headquarters  Arirang TV