Taekwondo 태권도Taekwondo Preschool

Promotion from one geup to the next can proceed rapidly in some schools, since schools often allow geup promotions every two, three, or four months. Students of geup rank learn the most basic techniques first, and then move on to more advanced techniques as they approach first dan. Many of the older and more traditional schools often take longer to allow students to test for higher ranks than newer, more contemporary schools, as they may not have the required testing intervals. View Taekwondo belt levels »

Taekwondo Preschool Red Belt
Taegeuk 태극 Poomse

Taegeuk 8 태극 8장
(Taegeuk Pal-jahng)


Poomse is the foundation for the teaching of Taekwondo. A poomse, or form, is a detailed pattern of defense-and-attack motions and techniques used in traditional martial arts. Poomse is useful in developing proper kinetics, mental and physical fortitude.

Taegeuk 8 태극 8장 (Taegeuk Pal-jahng) World Taekwondo (WT) Poomse 품새

Taegeuk 태극 (in World Taekwondo (WT)) refers to a set of poomse used to create a foundation for the teaching of taekwondo. A poomse or form is a detailed pattern of defense-and-attack motions and techniques used in traditional martial arts. Poomse is often romanized as poomsae or pumsae. The word taeguek (the Korean pronunciation of Taiji/T'ai Chi) refers to the important principle in east Asian Taoist thought of the union of yin and yang.

Each taegeuk form symbolizes a specific state thought to be indicative of the belt the student currently holds, and is represented in World Taekwondo (WT) by trigrams similar to those found in the four corners of the South Korean flag. Various schools sometimes insert one of a variety of other forms before the first taegeuk (taegeuk il-jang) such as "Basic #1 Pattern". In order to receive a black belt the student must perform all taegeuk forms consecutively.

Taegeuk 8 태극 8장 (Taegeuk Pal-jahng)

Korean: 태극 8장 (Taegeuk Pal-jahng)

Meaning: Earth

Movements: approx 35

Difficulty Level:  Advanced

Grade Level: 2nd Geup

Ranking: Red Belt

Style: World Taekwondo (WT)

Taegeuk 8 태극 8장 (Taegeuk Pal-jahng) World Taekwondo (WT) Poomse 품새
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The trigram associated with this poomse represents the Earth. Also, there is a representation of North and Mother. The associated trigram of this poomse is Yin. Yin, here, represents the end of the beginning, the evil part of all that is good. This being the last of the poomse taegeuk, it represents the end of the circle and the cyclic nature of the Earth.

This is the pattern you will learn when you are at 'Red belt'. All students studying in World Taekwondo (WT) Kukkiwon style must learn these forms, or taegeuk 태극, to advance to a higher belt level. There are eight taegeuk forms, each one similar to the previous one, but each time with more complicated techniques to display the students' mastery of the techniques learned during lessons, as well as the ability to interconnect these techniques. Note: Some schools use other belt colors. Belt levels vary from school to school.

Techniques

Both basic and advanced Taekwondo techniques can be contained within a single pattern and the higher the level of the practitioner, the greater the difficulty of the techniques and the complexity of the pattern. Remember a poomse is a detailed pattern of defense-and-attack motions and techniques used in traditional martial arts.

Taekwondo Attention Stance (charyeot) Taekwondo Ready Stance (junbi) Taekwondo Front stance Taekwondo Back Stance Taekwondo Cat Stance (beom sogi) Taekwondo Middle Block Taekwondo Single Wide Open Hand Block (wesanteul makgi) Taekwondo Double Hand Knife Block Taekwondo Palm Heel Pressing Block Taekwondo Single Knife Hand Outward Block Taekwondo Supported Trunk Block (momtong kodureo makgi) Taekwondo Supported Downward Block (kodureo naeryeo makgi) Taekwondo Middle Punch Taekwondo Turning Elbow Strike ( 팔굽 돌려치기 palgup-dollyeo-chigi ) Taekwondo Pulling and Punching ( 당겨지르기 danggyeo-jireugi ) Taekwondo Double Punch Taekwondo Back Knuckle Forward Strike ( 등주먹 앞치기 deung-jumeok-ap-chigi ) Taekwondo Front Kick (ap chagi) Taekwondo Jumping Front Kick Taekwondo Bow (kyeong nye)

Key Points

  • Accuracy. Taegeuk patterns should begin and end in the same place.
  • Posture. Practitioners must have their body weight correctly distributed during each different stance and during footwork. Each technique must be correctly aligned.
  • Realism. Taekwondo patterns are the learning ground for real combat. As such, every technique must display the requisite speed, power and firmness to be realistically used as an attack or defense move.
  • Spirit. A competitor's 'presence' on the mat must be as credible as his/her technique. Self belief, confidence in abilities, and intention to perform to a personal best are tangible virtues considered indispensable in Taekwondo practitioners.
  • Decorum. Proper manners must be displayed when interacting with the judges directly before and after the pattern. Respect must also be extended to rival competitors, clubs and other officials.
  • Form. General qualities that judges look for in any Taekwondo practitioner include proper breathing technique and body control. The diaphragm must be engaged in deep breathing, shallow breathing concentrated in the upper abdomen results in raised shoulders and stressed muscles. The muscles of the body should be lightly relaxed in order to perform the pattern with fluidity, speed and grace. Muscles should only be tensed at the moment of imaginary impact in order to commute maximum power to any individual Taekwondo technique.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taegeuk 8 태극 8장 (Taegeuk Pal-jahng) World Taekwondo (WT) Poomse Map

 

 

 

 

Question. What is the korean terminology for Ready Stance?

Ready Stance refers to the most common ready position used in Tae Kwon Do training. Ready Stance is performed by standing with the feet one foot-length from origin apart, measured from the outside edge (Foot Sword) of the feet, with arms slightly bent and loosely held fists about one fist size apart just below the navel and the fists should be a fist size away from the body.

 

 


Taegeuk 태극 Poomse

Taegeuk 태극 (in World Taekwondo (WT)) refers to a set of poomse 품새 used to create a foundation for the teaching of taekwondo. A poomse or form (represented by 形 or 型) is a detailed pattern of defense-and-attack motions and techniques used in traditional martial arts. The word taeguek (the Korean pronunciation of Taiji/T'ai Chi) refers to the important principle in east Asian Taoist thought of the union of yin and yang. Each taegeuk form symbolizes a specific state thought to be indicative of the belt the student currently holds, and is represented in World Taekwondo (WT) by trigrams similar to those found in the four corners of the South Korean flag. View more information about Taegeuk 태극 Poomse ».

taegeuk 1 taegeuk 2 taegeuk 3 taegeuk 4 taegeuk 5 taegeuk 6 taegeuk 7 taegeuk 8

 

General qualities that judges look for in any taekwondo practitioner include proper breathing technique and body control. The diaphragm must be engaged in deep breathing, shallow breathing concentrated in the upper abdomen results in raised shoulders and stressed muscles. The muscles of the body should be lightly relaxed in order to perform the pattern with fluidity, speed and grace. Muscles should only be tensed at the moment of imaginary impact in order to commute maximum power to any individual taekwondo technique. For more information View Key Points »

RESOURCES
This article uses material from the Wikipedia articles "Taegeuk" and "Hyeong", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

 

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